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Together: Connecting your spirit of service and fellowship with CKI and the Kiwanis family

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Are you a former CKI member—and still committed to service leadership? Or getting ready to graduate and leave your CKI club? Connect with other alumni!

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As the network grows, we will continue to evolve to ensure a valuable experience for our members. Through blogs and story-sharing, let’s reconnect and find out who's where and what they are up to.
 
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  • Jen Wolff: from member to mentor!

    From the beginning, Jen Wolff learned how important personal connection is to the Kiwanis family. It’s a benefit that has stuck with her to the present day, both as an active Circle K alumnus and a current Kiwanis club member. 
    In fact, Jen might never have heard of Circle K or the larger Kiwanis family at all—except for her connection to a Circle K member during her freshman year at Towson University in Maryland.
    “My roommate and I were walking through the student union,” Jen says. “The Circle K club was recruiting there, and my roommate joined. She swore she would get me to join.”
    It took until Jen’s junior year, but when she finally joined the club, she was all in. She even became the vice president of the Towson University chapter within a week—and eventually helped the club’s membership double. After all, she had already learned a key lesson about recruiting from her roommate.
    “It’s like we say in Kiwanis: people join people, not clubs.”
    [subhead]
    Member and mentor
    [copy]
     Like many alumni, Jen has great memories of the service and fellowship of her Circle K days.  And now that she’s a district administrator, she even sees her fondness for former advisors in a new light. But during her college years, it took a while to comprehend the full value of that mentorship.
    “I didn’t have much exposure to Kiwanians,” she says. “I saw the same two Kiwanis members at our events, and I went to a few Kiwanis meetings where we sat and ate chicken and otherwise just stayed at our table. I didn’t have an understanding of the special relationship between Kiwanians and our Service Leadership Programs until I joined the CKI district board as a committee chair.”
    It became even clearer during one Capital District event, when the Kiwanian John Tyner let some CKI members room at his home in Rockville, Maryland. 
    “I remember thinking, ‘Who would let 20 college kids they don’t know stay at their house?’” Jen says. “Now I am that Kiwanian. Every year at that first board meeting, I’ll have a few bewildered CKI board members say to me, ‘I can’t believe you’re letting us all stay here.’ I always think of John when I do something like that, and I get a good laugh. I didn’t understand what a true Kiwanian was until I met John Tyner.”
    Her experience also gives her insights into the importance of membership. As a student and a Kiwanian, Jen has seen how much it can mean to a young adult—and the difference a committed mentor can make.
    “Until Circle K, I didn’t know I had all these things in me—facilitation during leadership training, standing in front of people and speaking, that kind of thing,” Jen says. “It made me realize what I’m capable of, what I didn’t think was possible.”
    [subhead]
    A Kiwanis-family family
    [copy]
    When Jen first met Jeffrey Wolff, he was a Kiwanian on rhe Capital District Committee for CKI. At the time, she says, Jeffrey was just “the young, cool Kiwanian, the guy who’d show us his latest techie toy, like a new tablet—this was way before iPads were around.”
    A few years later, she was a college graduate and became a member of the Tysons Corner/McLean Kiwanis Club in Virginia. “I remember walking into the club and saying, ‘What are you doing here?’” Jen says. “And he said, ‘Well, I’m a member here.’”
    That was just the beginning of what became a lifelong relationship. Jen and Jeffrey are married now and have three children. And they continue to have the Kiwanis family in common too. Even if fate hadn’t brought her and Jeffrey into each other’s lives, Jen says, she would be a Kiwanian and a CKI advisor. But it’s a definite advantage for both of them to be Kiwanis leaders and CKI advisors.
    “We always joke that if we were married to someone who wasn’t in Kiwanis, they wouldn’t understand,” she says.
    In fact, Jen first got reacquainted with Circle K when she joined the Capital District’s CKI committee as a zone administrator while Jeff was the CKI district administrator. And when Jeff stepped down in 2010, Jen stepped up. She has been the district administrator since then. 
    In her seven years as a Kiwanian, Jen has also been a two-term distinguished president of the Tysons Corner/McLean Kiwanis Club and a Capital Kiwanis distinguished lieutenant governor. In addition, she is currently the editor of the district’s publication, The Capital Kiwanian. 
    [subhead]
    Alumni advantages
    [copy]
    Being a CKI alumnus has been a benefit to Jen even beyond her family (and the Kiwanis family). A graphic designer, Jen got her first job out of college thanks to her CKI membership. She interviewed for a design position with a rural advocacy group, and after some “back and forth,” she says, she was hired.
    “A few months down the road, the person who hired me mentioned that it had been between me and another person,” Jen adds. “I said, ‘What made you choose me?’ She said, ‘You had on your resume that you did club building and membership work, and we wanted someone with a membership background who could also be a sounding board for us.’
    “It was a graphic design job,” she adds, “but because of my experience at CKI, I had an advantage.”
    Now she helps current members create that kind of advantage through service experience and leadership skills. And she believes CKI members and young alumni will provide a mutual benefit for Kiwanis clubs and members who stay involved with the program.
    “I think Kiwanis is trending in that direction—becoming more and more accepting of what younger members bring to the table,” she says.
    And when it comes to club membership, Jen believes younger Circle K alumni should be proactive too. “It’s such a fulfilling thing to do in a world that’s so busy,” she says. “Talking to people who aren’t in a Kiwanis club, they sometimes tell me they visited a club and it just wasn’t for them. But it might have been just that club. 
    “I tell them, ‘That might not have been the one, but keep looking for one—or even build one that works for you.’” 

    From the beginning, Jen Wolff learned how important personal connection is to the Kiwanis family. It’s a benefit that has stuck with her to the present day, both as an active Circle K alumnus and a current Kiwanis club member.

    In fact, Jen might never have heard of Circle K or the larger Kiwanis family at all—except for her connection to a Circle K member during her freshman year at Towson University in Maryland.

    “My roommate and I were walking through the student union,” Jen says. “The Circle K club was recruiting there, and my roommate joined. She swore she would get me to join.”

    It took until Jen’s junior year, but when she finally joined the club, she was all in. She even became the vice president of the Towson University chapter within a week—and eventually helped the club’s membership double. After all, she had already learned a key lesson about recruiting from her roommate.

    “It’s like we say in Kiwanis: people join people, not clubs.”

    Member and mentor

    Like many alumni, Jen has great memories of the service and fellowship of her Circle K days.  And now that she’s a district administrator, she even sees her fondness for former advisors in a new light. But during her college years, it took a while to comprehend the full value of that mentorship.

    I didn’t have much exposure to Kiwanians,” she says. “I saw the same two Kiwanis members at our events, and I went to a few Kiwanis meetings where we sat and ate chicken and otherwise just stayed at our table. I didn’t have an understanding of the special relationship between Kiwanians and our Service Leadership Programs until I joined the CKI district board as a committee chair.”

    It became even clearer during one Capital District event, when the Kiwanian John Tyner let some CKI members room at his home in Rockville, Maryland.

    “I remember thinking, ‘Who would let 20 college kids they don’t know stay at their house?’” Jen says. “Now I am that Kiwanian. Every year at that first board meeting, I’ll have a few bewildered CKI board members say to me, ‘I can’t believe you’re letting us all stay here.’ I always think of John when I do something like that, and I get a good laugh. I didn’t understand what a true Kiwanian was until I met John Tyner.”

    Her experience also gives her insights into the importance of membership. As a student and a Kiwanian, Jen has seen how much it can mean to a young adult—and the difference a committed mentor can make.

    “Until Circle K, I didn’t know I had all these things in me—facilitation during leadership training, standing in front of people and speaking, that kind of thing,” Jen says. “It made me realize what I’m capable of, what I didn’t think was possible.”

    A Kiwanis-family family

    When Jen first met Jeffrey Wolff, he was a Kiwanian on the Capital District Committee for CKI. At the time, she says, Jeffrey was just “the young, cool Kiwanian, the guy who’d show us his latest techie toy, like a new tablet—this was way before iPads were around.”

    A few years later, she was a college graduate and became a member of the Tysons Corner/McLean Kiwanis Club in Virginia. “I remember walking into the club and saying, ‘What are you doing here?’” Jen says. “And he said, ‘Well, I’m a member here.’”

    That was just the beginning of what became a lifelong relationship. Jen and Jeffrey are married now and have three children. And they continue to have the Kiwanis family in common too. Even if fate hadn’t brought her and Jeffrey into each other’s lives, Jen says, she would be a Kiwanian and a CKI advisor. But it’s a definite advantage for both of them to be Kiwanis leaders and CKI advisors.

    “We always joke that if we were married to someone who wasn’t in Kiwanis, they wouldn’t understand,” she says.

    In fact, Jen first got reacquainted with Circle K when she joined the Capital District’s CKI committee as a zone administrator while Jeff was the CKI district administrator. And when Jeff stepped down in 2010, Jen stepped up. She has been the district administrator since then.

    In her seven years as a Kiwanian, Jen has also been a two-term distinguished president of the Tysons Corner/McLean Kiwanis Club and a Capital Kiwanis distinguished lieutenant governor. In addition, she is currently the editor of the district’s publication, The Capital Kiwanian.

    Alumni advantages

    Being a CKI alumnus has been a benefit to Jen even beyond her family (and the Kiwanis family). A graphic designer, Jen got her first job out of college thanks to her CKI membership. She interviewed for a design position with a rural advocacy group, and after some “back and forth,” she says, she was hired.

    “A few months down the road, the person who hired me mentioned that it had been between me and another person,” Jen adds. “I said, ‘What made you choose me?’ She said, ‘You had on your resume that you did club building and membership work, and we wanted someone with a membership background who could also be a sounding board for us.’

    “It was a graphic design job,” she adds, “but because of my experience at CKI, I had an advantage.”

    Now she helps current members create that kind of advantage through service experience and leadership skills. And she believes CKI members and young alumni will provide a mutual benefit for Kiwanis clubs and members who stay involved with the program.

    “I think Kiwanis is trending in that direction—becoming more and more accepting of what younger members bring to the table,” she says.

    And when it comes to club membership, Jen believes younger Circle K alumni should be proactive too. “It’s such a fulfilling thing to do in a world that’s so busy,” she says. “Talking to people who aren’t in a Kiwanis club, they sometimes tell me they visited a club and it just wasn’t for them. But it might have been just that club.

    “I tell them, ‘That might not have been the one, but keep looking for one—or even build one that works for you.’” 


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  • Need service and fundraising ideas?

    Planning service projects can be difficult. We’re here to help. Get the ball rolling with these project ideas!


    • Clean up or revamp a community space. This project could only take a few hours, or you could turn it into a daylong event. Either way, you’d be surprised how much of a difference cleaning up common space in your community can make. For example, cleaning up a neighborhood park keeps people that need to see immediate results engaged in your neighborhood improvement activities.
    • Host a fundraising event. Use your creativity—you could do practically anything! Plan a fashion show for younger girls, organize a cookout and sell tickets, or create a unique and engaging game for people in your community. The money you raise could be donated to the Kiwanis International Foundation or The Eliminate Project. You could also donate the money to an initiative that you and your club members feel strongly about. Need more detailed ideas? Check these out!
    • Plan a day to educate your community. Pick a topic that you and your club members feel strongly about. Then take a day out of your busy schedule and give your community the best gift you can: education! Division 13 of the California-Nevada-Hawaii District decided to take on this challenge. Check out what their club did for their community!

    That’s just a handful of ideas. For more, view the entries from the Kiwanis One Day video contest!


    And remember, inspiration is a two-way street. Share the projects your club has been doing. Who knows what kind of inspiration you could give to another club! So please, share your story.




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  • 8 great hidden gems of Indianapolis

    ICON 2015 will be in Indianapolis, Indiana, this month. With convention and the centennial celebration, it’s a busy few days. But be sure to save time to explore the city. We can help—with this list of eight hidden gems in Indy. 

    1. Our airport (No, really—it’s cool!)
    If you’re flying into and out of the Indianapolis International Airport, be sure to look around. It’s filled with outstanding restaurants, some great Indiana souvenirs, and the building is designed to perfection! In fact, the Indianapolis International Airport was named (again) in 2014 by the Airports Council International as Best Airport in North America!

    2. The restaurant scene
    Indianapolis used to be infamous as a “chain restaurant” city. Not anymore. While we’ve long been known for St. Elmo’s Steakhouse, the list of unique, local restaurants with chef geniuses at their helms is long. And many of them are in walking distance of the convention center! Check out a few favorites. Plus, downtown’s City Market is a one-stop locale for high-quality eats! 

    3. The artisan cocktail scene
    Whether you drink cocktails, mocktails or even just water with a lime—there’s something special for you in Indy. Mixologists reign at Plat 99, The Libertine, and the 1933 Lounge, to name a few. It’s not just about the cocktails and mocktails; for example Plat 99, located in The Alexander Hotel, serves complimentary truffle-oil popcorn, a special small-plate menu, a stunning view of downtown, and 99 original glass light features created by artist Jorge Pardo! These places are each unique in their own ways, so be sure to check them out during your stay!

    4. Georgia Street
    Before Indianapolis hosted the Super Bowl in 2012, the street received a massive overhaul to become a major gathering place, hang-out locale and party site. Special occasions bring live bands, public events and food trucks. The last Friday of every month brings “Food Truck Friday” (beginning at 11 a.m.) and Happy Hour on Georgia Street (beginning at 3:30 p.m.). The last Friday in June will also feature the Kiwanis International Birthday Bash on Georgia Street, with live band Zanadoo, birthday cake and DJ Andy Austin. Kiwanians and Indy residents will mix, mingle and enjoy a summer evening on this hot-spot street.

    5. The Indianapolis Cultural Trail
    The Cultural Trail is eight miles of wide walkway that connects Indy’s six cultural districts. Explore the city on foot at a leisurely pace, or rent a bike at a bike share station. The trail is also great for your morning or afternoon run! However you use the trail, you’ll find plenty of restaurants, art and city sights along the way.

    6. The art scene
    The Indianapolis Museum of Art is a not-to-miss attraction. And now it’s good company with other galleries, which featuring local—and not-so-local—artists and a variety of media. Check out these galleries! If you're feeling adventurous be sure to spend time at 100 Acres, adjacent to the Indianapolis Museum of Art. As the name implies, it’s 100 acres of art mingling with nature, including a variety of biomes, sculptures and media with which visitors can interact!

    7. Fountain Square
    Fountain Square is meant for those who seek art, good food, entertainment and even duckpin bowling! Accessible from the Cultural Trail, Fountain Square is home to a great knit shop; Peruvian, Thai, Tex-Mex, Greek and Farm-to-Table fare (to name a few options); the Murphy Building (host to artist studios and galleries) and other galleries; restored theatres for live shows, music and swing dancing; and two duckpin bowling alleys (Atomic Bowl and Action Bowl) in the Fountain Square Theatre Building.

    8. Mass Ave
    Massachusetts Avenue angles north and east within the city like a spoke of culture and taste. And it continues to expand its array of hip shops and restaurants. Savor pre-dinner artisan chocolates at The Best Chocolate in Town. And shop for fun finds at Homespun, Silver in the City, Global Gifts, and Mass Ave Toys!



    ICON 2015 will be in Indianapolis, Indiana, this month. With convention and the centennial celebration, it’s a busy few days. But be sure to save time to explore the city. We can help—with this list of eight hidden gems in Indy.


    1. Our airport (No, really—it’s cool!)

    If you’re flying into and out of the Indianapolis International Airport, be sure to look around. It’s filled with outstanding restaurants, some great Indiana souvenirs, and the building is designed to perfection! In fact, the Indianapolis International Airport was named (again) in 2014 by the Airports Council International as Best Airport in North America!


    2. The restaurant scene

    Indianapolis used to be infamous as a “chain restaurant” city. Not anymore. While we’ve long been known for St. Elmo’s Steakhouse, the list of unique, local restaurants with chef geniuses at their helms is long. And many of them are in walking distance of the convention center! Check out a few favorites. Plus, downtown’s City Market is a one-stop locale for high-quality eats!


    3. The artisan cocktail scene

    Whether you drink cocktails, mocktails or even just water with a lime—there’s something special for you in Indy. Mixologists reign at Plat 99, The Libertine, and the 1933 Lounge, to name a few. It’s not just about the cocktails and mocktails; for example Plat 99, located in The Alexander Hotel, serves complimentary truffle-oil popcorn, a special small-plate menu, a stunning view of downtown, and 99 original glass light features created by artist Jorge Pardo! These places are each unique in their own ways, so be sure to check them out during your stay!


    4. Georgia Street

    Before Indianapolis hosted the Super Bowl in 2012, the street received a massive overhaul to become a major gathering place, hang-out locale and party site. Special occasions bring live bands, public events and food trucks. The last Friday of every month brings “Food Truck Friday” (beginning at 11 a.m.) and Happy Hour on Georgia Street (beginning at 3:30 p.m.). The last Friday in June will also feature the Kiwanis International Birthday Bash on Georgia Street, with live band Zanadoo, birthday cake and DJ Andy Austin. Kiwanians and Indy residents will mix, mingle and enjoy a summer evening on this hot-spot street.


    5. The Indianapolis Cultural Trail

    The Cultural Trail is eight miles of wide walkway that connects Indy’s six cultural districts. Explore the city on foot at a leisurely pace, or rent a bike at a bike share station. The trail is also great for your morning or afternoon run! However you use the trail, you’ll find plenty of restaurants, art and city sights along the way.


    6. The art scene

    The Indianapolis Museum of Art is a not-to-miss attraction. And now it’s good company with other galleries, which featuring local—and not-so-local—artists and a variety of media. Check out these galleries! If you're feeling adventurous be sure to spend time at 100 Acres, adjacent to the Indianapolis Museum of Art. As the name implies, it’s 100 acres of art mingling with nature, including a variety of biomes, sculptures and media with which visitors can interact!


    7. Fountain Square

    Fountain Square is meant for those who seek art, good food, entertainment and even duckpin bowling! Accessible from the Cultural Trail, Fountain Square is home to a great knit shop; Peruvian, Thai, Tex-Mex, Greek and Farm-to-Table fare (to name a few options); the Murphy Building (host to artist studios and galleries) and other galleries; restored theatres for live shows, music and swing dancing; and two duckpin bowling alleys (Atomic Bowl and Action Bowl) in the Fountain Square Theatre Building.


    8. Mass Ave

    Massachusetts Avenue angles north and east within the city like a spoke of culture and taste. And it continues to expand its array of hip shops and restaurants. Savor pre-dinner artisan chocolates at The Best Chocolate in Town. And shop for fun finds at Homespun, Silver in the City, Global Gifts, and Mass Ave Toys!



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  • Life is short. Are you enjoying it?

    Its an endless cycle. We have to go to school for years to get a decent job. Then we invest our time and energy into our careers. In turn, we’re too worn out by the time we get home to enjoy anything we have worked for. And if we wait too long to open up our eyes, life will have passed us by.


    But happiness is not something we can buy. It’s something we hold within ourselves. With awareness of ourselves and our environment, we are able to unlock our happiness. Here are a few tips for making happiness happen: 

    • Be part of something you believe in. If you are a member of a Kiwanis club, you’re already doing it. But you can always get more involved with fulfilling the mission of the club. If you aren’t a Kiwanis club member, check out what’s available in your community
    • Simplify your happiness. What does it take to make you happy? How do you define your happiness? If what you are thinking about is a long extravagant explanation, cut it! Realize that happiness comes from appreciating the little things in life—the simple things.    
    • Live in the present. It’s so easy to get wrapped up in the past. To ponder why this or that happened. But really, does it matter? If you can learn to start living in the present and focusing on what’s good right now, you’ll begin to notice the greatness of each moment. 
    • Never stop learning. If you continue to seek new knowledge, you’ll never stop growing. By learning new things that fascinate you, you will be able to step out of the “blah” of your standard day, take some personal time . . . and continuously grow!

    There are plenty of other things you can do to help yourself find happiness. But start small—the journey to happiness can be confusing and difficult. By implementing these tips today, you’ll start unlocking the happiness within . . . and enjoy the long-term benefits it brings.


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  • ICON 2015: Don't miss out!

    Every year, thousands of Kiwanis-family members attend an international convention. These annual events are full of fun, fellowship, elections and recognition. And if ever there was a year not to miss, this is the one: we’ll all be celebrating Kiwanis International’s 100th anniversary!


    The 2015 Circle K International convention will take place June 24–27 in Indianapolis. Even better, it will happen along with the conventions for Kiwanis, Key Club and Aktion Club.


    Stay ahead of the crowd—take a sneak peek at the convention schedule! There will be a lot of sights to see and opportunities to celebrate. Just a few of them include:

    • Daily walks on the Cultural Trail.
    • Tours of the Kiwanis International building.
    • The Centennial Playground build at Hawthorne Park.
    • A baseball game followed by fireworks at Victory Field. 
    • The Monumental Pancake Lunch on Monument Circle.
    • Our all-night Birthday Bash on Georgia street.

    There’s one event you do not want to miss: the Alumni Reception on Saturday, June 27. The reception will take place 12–1:30 p.m. at the Hard Rock Cafe
    (located at 49 South Meridian Street in Indianapolis). Join us—and connect or reconnect with an array of fellow alumni. Attendees will receive lunch, a unique souvenir and the opportunity to meet the 2014–15 Circle K International and Key Club International presidents. Register now. Spots are filling up fast!


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  • Leadership that lasts a lifetime

    In Circle K, you pushed the limits—and pushed yourself beyond your comfort zone. Why stop now? The leadership skills you gained as a member will last a lifetime—in your career and everything else you do.


    Take a look at the qualities that leaders share, and how you can enhance each one:

    • Honesty. Mean it when you preach it! Honesty is not just about the words you use. It’s about how well they align with what you do.  
    • Ability to delegate. You may be the one calling the shots, but you still need to trust in your team. Let all members of your team help advance toward the goal—play on everyone’s strengths. Remember, you’re not doing this alone. 
    • Communication. If you can’t convey your vision to your team, your team members won't all work toward the same goals. Clear communication is key to leading any group to success.
    • Sense of humor. Things don’t always go as planned! Things in CKI might have been a tad stressful at times—but they were ultimately fun and lighthearted. Encourage your team to laugh at the inevitable mistakes. Crying over them only slows things down.  
    • Commitment. Work hard, so you can show that hard work is being done on every level. If you want to be followed . . . lead by example!

    And don’t forget: every Kiwanis club needs members with strong leadership skills. If your club is lacking those qualities, step up! And if you're not currently a Kiwanian, find a club and join! The Kiwanis family—and the communities we serve—can always use more leaders.


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  • How are you supporting The Eliminate Project?

    With The Eliminate Project, the Kiwanis family is raising US$110 million to save and protect millions of mothers and newborns from maternal and neonatal tetanus. You can be a part of it. Help protect the connection between mother and child that this painful, deadly disease destroys.


    And help inspire others by getting the word out. If you’re planning a service or fundraising event, let us know! Email TheEliminateProject@Kiwanis.org prior to your event, and we will help you generate awareness.  


    Has your event already occurred? Let us highlight your story. Email us, and we will include your story in our blog.


    When sending us your story, please include the name of the project, your contact information, and the club or clubs participating. Send that along with photos and your a 300-500 word story


    Remember to subscribe to The Eliminate Project blog and visit often!




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  • Stay in the know

    Are you socially connected with us? If not, here’s your opportunity to stay in the know! Use Twitter and Facebook to interact with fellow alumni, share your personal experiences and be aware of current Circle K and Kiwanis happenings. It’s easy to get started—just follow the links!


    Note: Kiwanis International is not responsible for the comments other people or entities post to these sites. Some pages and groups with “Kiwanis” in the title may not be affiliated with official Kiwanis-family entities.

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  • New club opportunity for CKI Alumni

    Been reminiscing about the good old days of your Circle K experience? Wishing you could relive CKI?Well, your wish is our command! Kiwanis International is proud to introduce Circle K International Alumni clubs, an opportunity for former members to extend their participation in Circle K. The clubs are open to any and all former members of of a Circle K club . . . and they can be organized in any community!


    What sets  Circle K International Alumni clubs apart from your standard Kiwanis club? The fee model. CKI Alumni clubs will pay a charter fee and an annual club renewal fee of US$350—regardless of the membership size. This allows for flexibility in club size!


    There are a variety of reasons CKI alumni may come together to open an alumni club. They might want to:

    • Enhance or renew the Circle K club experience.
    • Welcome new alumni to the district or community.
    • Continue friendships gained through Circle K—and develop new ones.
    • Gain personal and professional opportunities by connecting and providing service with other alumni and their families.
    • Act as a resource for current Circle K members and other members of the Kiwanis family. 
    • Stay engaged with Circle K’s partners and preferred charities.
    • Help make the community a better place through service projects.

    Interested? Get more information
    ! You asked for it, and we’ve made it happen. Start your own CKI Alumni club . . . and help the spirit of Circle K live on!


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  • President Button welcomes Circle K Alumni as Associate Kiwanis members

    Dear Circle K Alumni,

    Thank you for your service to your school, your community and the world as a Circle K member. You have made an immeasurable difference in the lives of others. I hope you will continue to make an impact on the world through the Circle K International Alumni group and the no-cost associate membership to Kiwanis International.


    As Circle K alumni, you are part of the Kiwanis global network, which allows you to participate in service opportunities and be invited to special events. You will also be able to access the many intrinsic values of Kiwanis, including connecting to your community, making friends wherever you go and developing leadership skills. You will continue to receive the alumni’s e-publication and other communications from the Kiwanis network. We hope this connection with Kiwanis will encourage you to continue a life of service.


    If you are looking to increase your impact on the world, there are special benefits for Key Club Alumni who join a Kiwanis club in the future. These associate members do not pay a new member fee or Kiwanis International dues for the first two years. To find a club near you, put your address into our Find A Club locator. I encourage you to visit several clubs in the area to find the best fit for you. Each of the more than 16,000 clubs in the Kiwanis family has its own personality.

    It is an exciting time to be associated with Kiwanis. Thank you for what you are doing today to make the world a better place and for the remarkable things you will do in the future as a part of the Kiwanis global network of service.


    In Kiwanis service,

    John R. Button, M.D.

    2014-15 President


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