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  • We are family

    Celebrate family all month long – the Kiwanis family that is. November is Kiwanis family month, the time of year dedicated to commemorating all branches of Kiwanis.

    K-Kids, Builders Club, Key Club International, Circle K International, Aktion Club and Kiwanis clubs unite around one mission: service. Need inspiration on how to partner with other Kiwanis family members? Come together to help save or protect women and babies from maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT) with one, or all, of these ideas below.

    Team up to help save lives. Partner with other Kiwanis family clubs to plan a fundraiser for The Eliminate Project. Host a pumpkin-decorating contest. Spice up your average bake sale. Show a family-friendly film. Involve the entire Kiwanis family in the event; more helpers and attendees mean more funds raised for women and babies. 

    Inspire each other. Invite members from another club to join an upcoming meeting. Take time to share why you are passionate about saving women and babies from MNT. Ask your guests to tell why they are involved as well. Even the smallest K-Kid member can motivate the crowd. 

    Make it a family affair. Host a family day for all of the clubs in your area and their families. You will have the opportunity to interact with other service-minded people of all ages as well as educate members of your community on The Eliminate Project and your club. Plan special activities like a raffle, community picnic or a live auction. Don’t forget, event programming should include activities for all age levels.

    Spread the word, save a life. Kiwanis-family clubs are passionate about saving lives. What about the rest of your community? Get them involved. Come together to tell your stories. Share information about The Eliminate Project. Report updates. You will help others learn about maternal and neonatal tetanus and how everyone can make a difference. Use local media stations, social media or word of mouth. And partnering with all levels of the Kiwanis family can extend your audience.

    Don’t forget to share your fundraising ideas with us as well as post pictures from your activities on our Facebook or Twitter accounts.

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  • Your gifts support SLPs

    When you give to the Kiwanis International Foundation, you support Kiwanis Service Leadership Programs like Key Club and Circle K International. Gifts to our foundation make a difference in your own hometown . . . and in lives a world away. That includes the lives of SLP members. See how.

    At the Kiwanis International Foundation, we believe in supporting our own family. And every year, we work toward making grants to Kiwanis' Service Leadership Programs.

    It’s your help that makes the successes of Key Leader, Aktion Club and Circle K International possible. For instance, grants approved in February 2014:
    • Helped young leaders focus on service leadership as the first.
    • Most meaningful leadership-development experience.
    • Sent adults with disabilities to training conferences.
    • Helped college students make their skills leadership-ready for their bright futures.
    When you give to the Kiwanis International Foundation, you make the Kiwanis family stronger. Give now!

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  • Dedication to sponsored youth continues

    Eric Paul, former Circle K International president, was recognized as an Outstanding Alumnus at the 2014 CKIx in Nashville because of humble spirit and his continued commitment to the program. Eric is now a Kiwanis-club member in the New York District, where he began with the Kiwanis family as a Key Clubber.

    At the 2014 CKIx in Nashville, Eric Paul of New York was awarded the Outstanding Alumni Award. It’s no wonder: he was an accomplished member and leader in both Key Club and Circle K International, but his commitment didn’t end there.

    Eric started his Kiwanis journey in Key Club, where he served as a club officer and was a distinguished lieutenant governor. He went on to become co-founder and charter secretary of the State University at Albany Circle K Club. In Circle K he served as district Governor, District Secretary, and Circle K International Vice President.

    After graduating, Eric joined his local Kiwanis club—and then continued to engage with Circle K members. As Kiwanis lieutenant governor in the New York District, he made special efforts to include Circle K members in the Kiwanis district as well as serve as a mentor encouraging them to get more involved in their community. Now he’s the 2014–2015 governor of the New York District. His project as governor is "A Re-Dedication to Sponsored Youth", which asks sponsoring Kiwanis clubs to get more involved with their sponsored Service Leadership Programs—especially through hands-on service. Eric also encourages sponsoring and nonsponsoring Kiwanis Clubs to commit additional budget funds to help Key Clubbers and Circle K members to attend conventions and conferences.

    When Eric was asked what he would share with alumni, he said, “Personally, I learned and grew so much through my membership in Key Club and Circle K that my involvement is my ‘giving back’ or ‘paying it forward,’” he says. “I encourage all alumni to get involved with Kiwanis, whether through an existing club or by starting the kind you see a need for. It’s a great, ongoing experience.”

    Eric is a great example of all the amazing work that is done by Key Club and Circle K Alumni every day.

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  • Kiwanis International Board makes some key decisions

    On October 4, the Kiwanis International Board of Trustees met in Indianapolis to vote on operating issues facing the organization. Here are some of the key decisions:

    Approved an official call to a meeting of the Kiwanis International Council, to be held January 22–23, 2015, in Detroit, Michigan, USA.

    Requested the Kiwanis International Foundation Board reassess its bylaws amendment adopted in July 2014 regarding the appointment of foundation board trustees.

    • Approved initial bylaws for Kiwanis Youth Programs Inc. (the new name of the former Key Club International 501c3 subsidiary corporation).
    • Adopted a new procedure on directors and officers insurance for districts.
    • Approved promoting existing initiatives as a means of converting young professionals into Kiwanis-club members.
    • Recommended that clubs and districts appoint and utilize a public relations chairman, using resource materials and support from Kiwanis International
    • Approved Sister Cities International as a new preferred charity of Kiwanis International.

    Click here for the entire list of Board actions.

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  • Your gifts support SLPs

    When you give to the Kiwanis International Foundation, you support Kiwanis Service Leadership Programs like Key Club and Circle K International. Gifts to our foundation make a difference in your own hometown . . . and in lives a world away. That includes the lives of SLP members. See how.

    At the Kiwanis International Foundation, we believe in supporting our own family. And every year, we work toward making grants to Kiwanis' Service Leadership Programs.

    It’s your help that makes the successes of Key Leader, Aktion Club and Circle K International possible. For instance, grants approved in February 2014:
    • Helped young leaders focus on service leadership as the first.
    • Most meaningful leadership-development experience.
    • Sent adults with disabilities to training conferences.
    • Helped college students make their skills leadership-ready for their bright futures.
    When you give to the Kiwanis International Foundation, you make the Kiwanis family stronger. Give now!

    Full story

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  • Dedication to sponsored youth continues

    At the 2014 CKIx in Nashville, Eric Paul of New York was awarded the Outstanding Alumni Award. It’s no wonder: he was an accomplished member and leader in both Key Club and Circle K International, but his commitment didn’t end there.

    Eric Paul, former Circle K International president, was recognized as an Outstanding Alumnus at the 2014 CKIx in Nashville because of humble spirit and his continued commitment to the program. Eric is now a Kiwanis-club member in the New York District, where he began with the Kiwanis family as a Key Clubber.

    Eric started his Kiwanis journey in Key Club, where he served as a club officer and was a distinguished lieutenant governor. He went on to become co-founder and charter secretary of the State University at Albany Circle K Club. In Circle K he served as district Governor, District Secretary, and Circle K International Vice President.

    After graduating, Eric joined his local Kiwanis club—and then continued to engage with Circle K members. As Kiwanis lieutenant governor in the New York District, he made special efforts to include Circle K members in the Kiwanis district as well as serve as a mentor encouraging them to get more involved in their community. Now he’s the 2014–2015 governor of the New York District. His project as governor is "A Re-Dedication to Sponsored Youth", which asks sponsoring Kiwanis clubs to get more involved with their sponsored Service Leadership Programs—especially through hands-on service. Eric also encourages sponsoring and nonsponsoring Kiwanis Clubs to commit additional budget funds to help Key Clubbers and Circle K members to attend conventions and conferences.

    When Eric was asked what he would share with alumni, he said, “Personally, I learned and grew so much through my membership in Key Club and Circle K that my involvement is my ‘giving back’ or ‘paying it forward,’” he says. “I encourage all alumni to get involved with Kiwanis, whether through an existing club or by starting the kind you see a need for. It’s a great, ongoing experience.”

    Eric is a great example of all the amazing work that is done by Key Club and Circle K Alumni every day.

    Full story

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  • Kiwanis International Board makes some key decisions

    On October 4, the Kiwanis International Board of Trustees met in Indianapolis to vote on operating issues facing the organization. Here are some of the key decisions:

    • Approved an official call to a meeting of the Kiwanis International Council, to be held January 22–23, 2015, in Detroit, Michigan, USA.
    • Requested the Kiwanis International Foundation Board reassess its bylaws amendment adopted in July 2014 regarding the appointment of foundation board trustees.
    • Approved initial bylaws for Kiwanis Youth Programs Inc. (the new name of the former Key Club International 501c3 subsidiary corporation).
    • Adopted a new procedure on directors and officers insurance for districts.
    • Approved promoting existing initiatives as a means of converting young professionals into Kiwanis-club members.
    • Recommended that clubs and districts appoint and utilize a public relations chairman, using resource materials and support from Kiwanis International
    • Approved Sister Cities International as a new preferred charity of Kiwanis International.

    Click here for the entire list of Board actions.

    Full story

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  • Birthday wish: to help save lives from tetanus

    By Kimberly Davis, Plattsburgh Kiwanis Club, New York District 

    In August 2014, I held a party benefitting The Eliminate Project to celebrate my 40th birthday. I secured eight sponsors that donated US$250 each in either cash or goods and asked each attendee to donate US$40 to The Eliminate Project in honor of my 40 years. The party raised more than US$3,800, which will help save or protect at least 2,000 women and their future newborns from maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT). 

    Who knew one party could have such an impact? I encourage others to ask for birthday (or Christmas) gifts that save lives this year.

    New York District Coordinator Sister Anne-Marie Kirmse (middle) presented two Walter Zeller Fellowships – one to myself (left) as outgoing Plattsburgh Kiwanis Club president and incoming lieutenant governor of the Adirondack Division, and one to Rob Shumway (right), the immediate past lieutenant governor and current Plattsburgh Kiwanis Club president. 




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  • The Eliminate Project in the news

    Thanks to your efforts, The Eliminate Project continues to make headlines across the world! Here are our latest mentions in the news:

    Los Altos High School clubs partner for fundraiser
    Los Altos Town Crier, 10/8/2014

    Kiwanis members fighting tetanus around globe
    Spring Valley Tribune, 10/14/2014

    Key Club to Scare Up Some Funds and Fun this Halloween
    Gant Daily, 10/16/2014

    Key Club to trick-or-treat for UNICEF

    Cheboygan News, 10/18/201

    Kiwanis Club working to help babies, mothers in developing countries
    NWI Times, 10/22/14

    Key clubs raise money for UNICEF
    Palestine Herald-Press, 10/23/2014

    The more publicity attracted for The Eliminate Project, the more awareness and funds Kiwanis International will be able to raise for the women and babies the project protects. Need help publicizing The Eliminate Project and your club’s fundraising and service activities to your local media? This public relations toolkit will provide everything you need.

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  • Measured progress: Fewer babies die from tetanus

    Fewer babies are dying from neonatal tetanus thanks to Kiwanis International, UNICEF and its partners.

    One baby now dies every 11 minutes from neonatal tetanus—a 15 percent drop from 2010 to 2013. Approximately 9,000 fewer babies die each year—25 fewer each day—from neonatal tetanus according to a new report published by the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group.

    “It is not a coincidence that the drop occurs during the exact same timeframe Kiwanis assumed a leadership role in helping to close a funding gap that was preventing our ability to immunize mothers against this deadly disease,” says Caryl Stern, President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

    “Seeing this measured progress is indeed an exciting and proud moment for the Kiwanis family,” says Randy DeLay, Campaign Chairman for The Eliminate Project.

    Fewer neonatal tetanus deaths can be credited to the joint efforts of those who support the MNT elimination program. Kiwanis, through The Eliminate Project, helps fund UNICEF’s immunization campaigns and outreach to women of reproductive age.

    “Seeing this reduction is gratifying, but the fact that 49,000 newborns are dying each year is unacceptable. We are grateful for partners like that Kiwanis that put children first among their priorities,” adds Stern. “We will keep working until the day that no mom has to worry about losing her baby to tetanus.”

    The Kiwanis family is a catalyst to reduce infant mortality, but we are not done. Approximately 134 newborns still die every day from tetanus. Millions of women and babies in 24 countries still need our support. 

    “Although we have much to celebrate, we must not rest on our successes,” adds DeLay. “Our wonderful partners at UNICEF continue to carry out immunization activities. The faster they receive our contributions, the faster those urgently-needed funds can be used.”

    Now is the time to take action. Empower your club. Give today. Help the Kiwanis family put tetanus where it belongs: in medical history books.

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Circle K International - Kiwanis Service Leadership Programs