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  • Georgia Key Club hosts Kiwanis Family Day

    By Emma Johnson, Key Club International Georgia District division 13 lieutenant governor

    Serve. That’s what Key Club members around the world are called to do. We are called step up, take a lead and make a difference. That is why the Georgia Key Club supports The Eliminate Project – because what seems like a small amount of money to some of us can help save or protect a woman and her future babies.

    On September 13, 2014, the Georgia Key Club hosted its second annual Kiwanis Family Day. During this event, the Kiwanis family from all over Georgia came out to the Georgia Southern vs. Georgia Tech football game at the Bobby Dodd stadium in Atlanta, Georgia to support The Eliminate Project. With US$5 of every football ticket bought through Georgia Key Club, we were able to raise US$2,125! Strategic planning, and promoting the event helped the Georgia Key Club save or protect more than 1,000 lives from maternal and neonatal teanus and have fun at the same time.

    Bonding through service with other branches of the Kiwanis family was inspiring. Kiwanis International has a mission to raise US$110 million by 2015, and the Georgia Key Club is proud to say that we have and still are helping meet that goal. With inspiration and awareness, we can change the world through service.

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  • What to share this month

     

    Halloween is less than a week away. It’s not too late to lend a helping hand and join the Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF challenge issued by 2014 spokesperson Zendaya.

    “As the 2014 Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF spokesperson, I am calling on all trick-or-treaters to do scary amounts of good.

    With Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF, a little goes a long way. Over the last six decades, Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF has raised more than $170 million to save and protect kids, so you know that’s a whole lot of good!

    I Trick-or-Treated for UNICEF while growing up in Oakland. We went door-to-door, carrying the orange box, hearing the coins jingling. Then we got home, poured the coins on the table and counted them all up—so much help for kids around the world. I loved it then, and I still do now.

    I love it because Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF gets kids involved, with helping people, with doing good. Most of all, I love it because it really empowers kids. The feeling is so special. Instead of going out there just for candy, kids know they’re going out there for a really great cause, doing something that’s so much fun.

    So join me to help the kids who need it most by Trick-or-Treating for UNICEF this Halloween. Have a spook-tacular Halloween!”


    It’s easy to participate. Pick your fundraising activity. Print supplies. Collect donations. Fill out the gift form and submit it with your club’s donations. Celebrate your hard work!

    Funds collected by Kiwanis-family clubs will once again support The Eliminate Project. So all those coins—which have added up to more than US$1.7 million the past three years—will protect women and babies from maternal and neonatal tetanus.


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  • Claim your place in history today

     

    As Kiwanis International celebrates its 100th anniversary, clubs and members across the globe are seeking ways to mark the occasion. How will you leave a lasting legacy? 

    Consider a US$1,500 gift to Kiwanis International. Your donation will be honored with a Centennial Award—complete with a lapel pin and framed medallion. Your gift will also help save or protect more than 833 women and their future babies from maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    Donors may make gifts or pledges between now and June 30, 2015. Presentation of the Centennial Award will begin in January 2015.

    Serving children is the heart and soul of Kiwanis. What better way to celebrate your commitment to Kiwanis and 100 proud years of history than by saving lives? Give now at www.TheEliminateProject.org/give.  



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  • Happy new Kiwanis year!

    Kiwanis continues to help keep families whole through our fight to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT). Since the campaign started, the funds we have raised will help save or protect nearly 39 million women and their future babies. Our fundraising efforts help UNICEF implement massive immunization campaigns to protect women and babies across the globe. Earlier this year, approximately 1.5 million women of reproductive age were immunized in Haiti and more than 1.3 million additional women were protected from tetanus in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    As we begin the 2014-2015 Kiwanis year, the campaign’s Year of Celebration and Kiwanis’ centennial year, we celebrate an exciting Year of Achievement.

    Here are a few highlights from the past 12 months:

    • In the last year, The Eliminate Project has increased giving by more than US$30 million, which will help save or protect at least 16.9 million women and their future babies from MNT.

    • We surpassed our halfway point of US$55 million during the Kiwanis International convention in Chiba, Japan.

    • We documented our first US$1 million gift from a Kiwanis member in January 2014.

    • We received an incredibly generous US$7 million gift from the Taiwan District. The district-wide commitment was a milestone for our campaign.

    • Our partners at the U.S. Fund for UNICEF committed to raise an additional US$7.2 million for The Eliminate Project, bringing their total contribution to US$15 million.

    Madagascar and Lao People’s Democratic Republic eliminated MNT. There are now 35 countries that have eliminated this disease and 24 countries where MNT remains a threat.

    Service Leadership Programs surpassed US$3 million raised for The Eliminate Project.

    Let’s keep the momentum going. You can make an impact during the Year of Celebration. Here are some tips to increase fundraising and make 2014-2015 a year full of celebration. 

    • Celebrate Kiwanis’ 100th anniversary with a gift to The Eliminate Project. Donors may make gifts for the Centennial Award between now and June 30, 2015. Presentation of the Centennial Award will begin in January 2015.

    • A group of Kiwanians will travel to Lao People’s Democratic Republic in November to witness UNICEF-led efforts.  Keep an eye out for their stories and photos to share with your club. The faces in their photos represent the millions of  women and babies Kiwanis will help through The Eliminate Project. 

    • The Mother’s Day/International Women’s Day Zeller Fellowship will be available once again beginning in March.  Honor an extraordinary woman in your life—by protecting the connection between millions of mothers and babies in more than 24 countries around the world.

    Fulfilling our promise to protect millions of newborns’ lives—and millions of mothers from broken hearts—depends on the passion and hard work of every member of the Kiwanis family. We need everyone participating in every district and club. 

    Help Kiwanis make history. Set a personal fundraising goal, make a multi-year commitment and encourage your club to participate. Give today. Remember, the sooner you give, the sooner lifesaving tetanus vaccines can be administered.

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  • Raise awareness with this easy fundraising idea

     

    Are you The Eliminate Project “expert” in your Kiwanis-family club? Get ready to put your knowledge to the test. Tailor this new fundraising idea to help your club increase awareness, raise funds and ultimately, help us eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    Quiz night

    Best for: All Kiwanis-family clubs

    Timeline: 6–8 weeks for preparation; 6–8 hours on day (and night) of event

    How it works: Let everyone show what they know. Host a trivia contest. Raise awareness by adding questions about your club and The Eliminate Project.

    To-do list:

    • Select a venue
    • Pick a date
    • Set an admission price
    • Choose what foods and drinks to serve
    • Find a host and quiz master
    • Create trivia questionnaire and answer sheets
    • Decide how points will be awarded
    • Solicit prize donations
    • Borrow a microphone and a timer
    • Register teams, individuals or families
    • Provide pens or pencils for all participants

    Supplies:

    • Pens or pencils
    • Prizes
    • Refreshments and paper goods
    • Money box
    • Tables and chairs
    • Printed trivia questionnaires
    • Answer sheets
    • Calculator to tally scores

    Tips

    • Create incentive. Organize a prize committee to coordinate donations.
    • Consider what else will be included with the admission price. What will you charge a la carte?
    • Find trivia at www.TheEliminateProject.org.

    You can download additional fundraising ideas and resources such as signs, informational brochures, “Ask me” stickers and more materials. And don’t forget to share your fundraising ideas with us as well as post pictures from your activities on our Facebook or Twitter accounts. 

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  • Mark your calendar for another worldwide update

     

    In 2010, we made a commitment. With every passing day, we become closer to fulfilling that commitment and making history.

    Where do we currently stand in our efforts? Find out during our seventh Worldwide Report Day on November 12. District teams will update Campaign Chairman Randy DeLay on their fundraising progress and summaries will be posted after each call on the website.

    In the push to reach The Eliminate Project’s fundraising goal, each day counts. Here’s how you can help:

    Announce Worldwide Report Day. After circling November 12 on your calendar, invite members of your club, division and district to participate.
    Make your commitment. Increase your district’s progress by asking your Kiwanis club to consider a Model Club commitment or to increase your club’s existing commitment. Report your club’s progress to your division coordinator.
    Publicize your efforts to save lives. Use Facebook and Twitter to share why you support The Eliminate Project.

    Witness the progress live. Visit www.TheEliminateProject.org/WWRD throughout the day on November 12 for updates. You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    As of September 30, we have raised US$70.9 million. We are closer to achieving our goal of US$110 million and keeping our promise to protect the connection between more than 61 million mothers and their babies. History is within our reach. What will you, your club, your division and your district do to be a part of it?

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  • Jeffrey Wolff creates connection

    Jeffrey Wolff 

    After graduating from college in the mid 1990s, Jeffrey Wolff couldn’t find a Kiwanis club that was right for him. His solution was to help create one.

     
    As a former Circle K International club member, Jeffrey benefited from staying in touch with other former members. After graduation, he was involved with CKI alumni in the Capital District—and those connections led to a group of young professionals chartering their own club in 1998.
     
    “We built the Kiwanis club we were looking for,” Jeffrey says. “We were one of the first young-professionals clubs in the organization. And one of the first things I did was get involved with CKI.”
     
    The mentality to serve
     
    Clearly, Jeffrey still had the can-do spirit that’s such a hallmark of the Kiwanis family’s Service Leadership Programs. As an alumnus both of Circle K and Key Club, he was seeking the kind of vitality among Kiwanians that he had enjoyed in high school and college.
     
    “Age wasn’t so much the issue as mentality,” Jeffrey says. “We wanted it to be less about meetings and more about projects. We were looking for connection.”
     
    They got it. To this day, he says, the Kiwanis Club of Tysons Corner/McLean, Virginia, has one of the highest service-per-hour rates of any club. For Jeffrey, service has been a defining aspect of the Kiwanis family from the beginning.

    In 10th grade, a friend invited him to join the Key Club of East Meadow High School in New York. “I loved it,” he says. “I hadn’t done much community service until then. It was a big club, about 200 members, and I found that I wanted to be part of that energy.”
     
    Influence and impact
     
    Another continuing inspiration is Marilyn Martin, his Key Club’s faculty advisor. In fact, Jeffrey credits his Kiwanis-club membership today to her work with Key Club members.
     
    “It was just something about her style,” Jeffrey says. “Some advisors are very hands-on, and some are too hands-off. Mrs. Martin gave you as much space as you wanted, but she could jump in to correct things without seeming to take over. Before people talked about coaching versus teaching, she was doing it.”
     
    George Martin, her husband, was a member of the Kiwanis club of East Meadow, which sponsored the Key Club. Together the Martins were examples and inspirations for Jeffrey even as he left high school and continued beyond Key Club.
     
    By the autumn of his freshman year at Hofstra University, Jeffrey and two other students had started a Circle K club (thanks in part to the CKI lieutenant governor, who had brought them together during the summer). When he transferred to George Mason University in Virginia, he joined the Circle K club there—and got his first taste of leadership beyond the club level, serving as a lieutenant governor and eventually as a Trustee of the International Board.
     
    Through it all, Jeffrey benefited from the guidance of adult mentors. And he has remembered their example. He’s a Key Club advisor himself now—he was also a CKI administrator for 10 years—and as a Kiwanian he worked to re-charter a Circle K club for George Mason. That’s in addition to his leadership at the Kiwanis club, division and district levels, which includes his term as 2011–12 Distinguished Governor of the Capital District.
     
    “I got so much from my advisors in Key Club and Circle K,” he says. “I want to have that impact. It’s about being a good mentor and influence. That’s the point of Kiwanis, for me.”
     
    A new perspective on passion
     
    Jeffrey continues to make an impact—and serve Kiwanis’ SLPs—through The Eliminate Project. He is the campaign’s SLP vice chairman.
     
    The desire to be a part of the effort started right away, when The Eliminate Project was announced at the 2010 Kiwanis International convention. His first child was just two months old, and the personal connection was obvious. But his work with members of the youth programs has broadened his perspective on the inspiration the campaign can bring them—and vice versa.
     
    “I think we’ve helped build a philanthropic mentality in students that may not have been there before,” Jeffrey says. “They enjoy service, and they see its benefits already—it’s what they do. But this helps show them what being part of a global fundraising effort can accomplish. What better way is there to engage young people than in a worldwide effort to prevent babies from dying needlessly of a completely preventable disease?”
     
    “I never had to sell the SLPs on The Eliminate Project,” he adds. “I can’t do justice to their passion. It’s a fire we need to harness.”
     
    For Jeffrey, it’s another perspective on the youthful passion that helps drive him as a Kiwanis club member and as a mentor. The Tysons Corner/McLean Kiwanis Club has continued to be ideal for time-pressed young professionals, he says, bringing in one or two guests every meeting. He credits the club’s constant recruiting efforts and the ease with which people find information about the club through an online tools for community-minded individuals such as MeetUp.
     
    Encountering potential members who have specific needs and expectations—while sharing an interest in service and fellowship—has emphasized for Jeffrey the importance of making sure the Kiwanis experience is personally fulfilling.
     
    “My advice?” he says. “If you don’t find a club that meets your needs, build one.”

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  • Key Clubs spread happiness in high school

    Key Clubs spread happiness in high school 

    Leadership Programs do help end bullying in schools. But research shows that anti-bullying campaigns were actually making the problem worse. So Key Club teamed up with the nonprofit Project Happiness to create a “happiness toolkit” that helps clubs spread happiness in their schools and communities. When students increase their personal happiness they become healthier, more productive and kinder. Even better, they also answer the call to serve others. Learn more at www.keyclub.org/projecthappiness.

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  • Join Kiwanis

    Join Kiwanis 

    Ready to change the world? Kiwanis is ready for you! Locate a Kiwanis club in your area. Reach out, learn more and get involved. Contact a club member or officer and let them know you’d like to learn more. After all, new members bring fresh energy and ideas to Kiwanis clubs. Are you ready to help children and families in your community? Continue your lifelong journey of service, leadership and fellowship. Join a Kiwanis club! Together we can change the world, one child and one community at a time.


    If you need help getting in touch with a Kiwanis club, give Kiwanis International a call at +1-800-549-2647, ext. 411.

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  • Jeffrey Wolff creates connection

    Jerrfrey Wolff 

    After graduating from college in the mid 1990s, Jeffrey Wolff couldn’t find a Kiwanis club that was right for him. His solution was to help create one.

     
    As a former Circle K International club member, Jeffrey benefited from staying in touch with other former members. After graduation, he was involved with CKI alumni in the Capital District—and those connections led to a group of young professionals chartering their own club in 1998.
     
    “We built the Kiwanis club we were looking for,” Jeffrey says. “We were one of the first young-professionals clubs in the organization. And one of the first things I did was get involved with CKI.”
     
    The mentality to serve
     
    Clearly, Jeffrey still had the can-do spirit that’s such a hallmark of the Kiwanis family’s Service Leadership Programs. As an alumnus both of Circle K and Key Club, he was seeking the kind of vitality among Kiwanians that he had enjoyed in high school and college.
     
    “Age wasn’t so much the issue as mentality,” Jeffrey says. “We wanted it to be less about meetings and more about projects. We were looking for connection.”
     
    They got it. To this day, he says, the Kiwanis Club of Tysons Corner/McLean, Virginia, has one of the highest service-per-hour rates of any club. For Jeffrey, service has been a defining aspect of the Kiwanis family from the beginning.

    In 10th grade, a friend invited him to join the Key Club of East Meadow High School in New York. “I loved it,” he says. “I hadn’t done much community service until then. It was a big club, about 200 members, and I found that I wanted to be part of that energy.”
     
    Influence and impact
     
    Another continuing inspiration is Marilyn Martin, his Key Club’s faculty advisor. In fact, Jeffrey credits his Kiwanis-club membership today to her work with Key Club members.
     
    “It was just something about her style,” Jeffrey says. “Some advisors are very hands-on, and some are too hands-off. Mrs. Martin gave you as much space as you wanted, but she could jump in to correct things without seeming to take over. Before people talked about coaching versus teaching, she was doing it.”
     
    George Martin, her husband, was a member of the Kiwanis club of East Meadow, which sponsored the Key Club. Together the Martins were examples and inspirations for Jeffrey even as he left high school and continued beyond Key Club.
     
    By the autumn of his freshman year at Hofstra University, Jeffrey and two other students had started a Circle K club (thanks in part to the CKI lieutenant governor, who had brought them together during the summer). When he transferred to George Mason University in Virginia, he joined the Circle K club there—and got his first taste of leadership beyond the club level, serving as a lieutenant governor and eventually as a Trustee of the International Board.
     
    Through it all, Jeffrey benefited from the guidance of adult mentors. And he has remembered their example. He’s a Key Club advisor himself now—he was also a CKI administrator for 10 years—and as a Kiwanian he worked to re-charter a Circle K club for George Mason. That’s in addition to his leadership at the Kiwanis club, division and district levels, which includes his term as 2011–12 Distinguished Governor of the Capital District.
     
    “I got so much from my advisors in Key Club and Circle K,” he says. “I want to have that impact. It’s about being a good mentor and influence. That’s the point of Kiwanis, for me.”
     
    A new perspective on passion
     
    Jeffrey continues to make an impact—and serve Kiwanis’ SLPs—through The Eliminate Project. He is the campaign’s SLP vice chairman.
     
    The desire to be a part of the effort started right away, when The Eliminate Project was announced at the 2010 Kiwanis International convention. His first child was just two months old, and the personal connection was obvious. But his work with members of the youth programs has broadened his perspective on the inspiration the campaign can bring them—and vice versa.
     
    “I think we’ve helped build a philanthropic mentality in students that may not have been there before,” Jeffrey says. “They enjoy service, and they see its benefits already—it’s what they do. But this helps show them what being part of a global fundraising effort can accomplish. What better way is there to engage young people than in a worldwide effort to prevent babies from dying needlessly of a completely preventable disease?”
     
    “I never had to sell the SLPs on The Eliminate Project,” he adds. “I can’t do justice to their passion. It’s a fire we need to harness.”
     
    For Jeffrey, it’s another perspective on the youthful passion that helps drive him as a Kiwanis club member and as a mentor. The Tysons Corner/McLean Kiwanis Club has continued to be ideal for time-pressed young professionals, he says, bringing in one or two guests every meeting. He credits the club’s constant recruiting efforts and the ease with which people find information about the club through an online tools for community-minded individuals such as MeetUp.
     
    Encountering potential members who have specific needs and expectations—while sharing an interest in service and fellowship—has emphasized for Jeffrey the importance of making sure the Kiwanis experience is personally fulfilling.
     
    “My advice?” he says. “If you don’t find a club that meets your needs, build one.”

    Full story

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Circle K International - Kiwanis Service Leadership Programs