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  • Kiwanis board simplifies alumni forming new Kiwanis clubs

    Building new Kiwanis clubs 

    Starting October 1, any former Key Club or CKI member that is a charter member of a new Kiwanis club does not need to pay the charter member fee. This change was approved by the Kiwanis International Board at its meeting in July.


    Kiwanis procedure 305.1.A now reads:
    Membership Application and Fee:  Before a new club may be organized and the charter presented, the required number of individuals shall have completed an application for membership and the club shall have paid a charter member fee per person, which shall be $50 for Tier A clubs; $25 for Tier B clubs; and $15 for Tier C clubs. However, a club shall not be billed a charter fee for any reported former Key Club and Circle K club members.

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  • Leave a footprint

    Footprints 

    As a past Circle K member, you've left a footprint—with service, fellowship and leadership. Tell your story and motivate future members. After all, one of the most effective ways to change the world is to persuade others to join you. Help inspire today’s students to join Circle K and help change the world.

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  • Alumni Spotlight: Dr. Button

    Dr. Button 

    On October 1, Kiwanis International will welcome John Button, M.D., to his term as the organization’s president. It’s a new experience for John, but it’s a fitting one: He has been involved with the Kiwanis family since the day he was born. His father was a dedicated community leader and Kiwanian. In fact, he was instrumental in founding the Ridgetown District High School Key Club—where John would later become an active member from 1965–1969.


    “My memories of Key Club are amongst the happiest of my high school days,” John says. “Key Club was the ‘elite’ club in the school, and almost 20% of the male student body were members. We were very active.”  

    In fact, the club ran a dance called “Teen Town” every Friday night during the school year. For John, the morning after was the best part. “The clean-up was my favourite job,” he says. “We would have the school to ourselves. I’d crank up the volume of the sound systems and get to work to the strains of the long versions of Susie Q, Light My Fire and Hey Jude.”

    John’s Kiwanis journey continued at the University of Western Ontario, where he was a member of Circle K before receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1973. He then graduated from the University of Toronto with a Doctor of Medicine degree in 1977.

    After a one-year internship, John returned to his hometown of Ridgetown, Ontario, and began practicing medicine with his father. He also joined the Kiwanis Club of Ridgetown—and he has been a member there ever since. He has served his club in a number of capacities over those 36 years. In addition, John is a distinguished lieutenant governor of his division and past governor of the Eastern Canada and the Caribbean District. He has also chaired the Iodine Deficiency Disorders Worldwide Service Project committee for his club and division.

    All that service and experience has given John some insights into the ways Kiwanis can change people’s lives—and the ways the organization itself is changing. He knows that keeping up with today’s world is a key to attracting many SLP alumni who haven’t yet joined a Kiwanis club.

    “We are becoming mission-driven as opposed to meeting-driven,” he says. “Membership options need to be flexible, as do club practices. We are evolving—and a new Kiwanis will be there for you when you are ready.  We need you, your ideas and your service muscle.”

    As president, John has a busy year ahead: He’ll be leading the organization during our celebration of Kiwanis’ 100th anniversary and the Kiwanis family’s completion of The Eliminate Project. He’ll also be an advocate for The Formula while tackling other everyday duties of being president.

    Ultimately, John’s work remains inspired by what Key Club and Circle K instilled in him as a student. “It was about fun and fellowship, but it was also about community engagement and service,” he says. “This is where I began to experience how life fulfilling service to others can be. And that belief has remained unshaken for 45 years.”

    Want to learn more about 2014–2015 Kiwanis International President John Button? Check out the October issue of Kiwanis magazine.

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  • Kiwanis board simplifies alumni forming new Kiwanis clubs

    Building new Kiwanis Clubs 

    Starting October 1, any former Key Club or CKI member that is a charter member of a new Kiwanis club does not need to pay the charter member fee. This change was approved by the Kiwanis International Board at its meeting in July.


    Kiwanis procedure 305.1.A now reads:
    Membership Application and Fee:  Before a new club may be organized and the charter presented, the required number of individuals shall have completed an application for membership and the club shall have paid a charter member fee per person, which shall be $50 for Tier A clubs; $25 for Tier B clubs; and $15 for Tier C clubs. However, a club shall not be billed a charter fee for any reported former Key Club and Circle K club members.

    Full story

    Comments (0)

  • Leave a footprint

    Footprints 

    As a past Key Club member, you've left a footprint—with service, fellowship and leadership. Tell your story and motivate future members. After all, one of the most effective ways to change the world is to persuade others to join you. Help inspire today’s students to join Key Club and help change the world.

    Full story

    Comments (0)

  • Alumni Spotlight: Dr. Button

    Dr. Button 

    On October 1, Kiwanis International will welcome John Button, M.D., to his term as the organization’s president. It’s a new experience for John, but it’s a fitting one: He has been involved with the Kiwanis family since the day he was born. His father was a dedicated community leader and Kiwanian. In fact, he was instrumental in founding the Ridgetown District High School Key Club—where John would later become an active member from 1965–1969.


    “My memories of Key Club are amongst the happiest of my high school days,” John says. “Key Club was the ‘elite’ club in the school, and almost 20% of the male student body were members. We were very active.”  

    In fact, the club ran a dance called “Teen Town” every Friday night during the school year. For John, the morning after was the best part. “The clean-up was my favourite job,” he says. “We would have the school to ourselves. I’d crank up the volume of the sound systems and get to work to the strains of the long versions of Susie Q, Light My Fire and Hey Jude.”

    John’s Kiwanis journey continued at the University of Western Ontario, where he was a member of Circle K before receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1973. He then graduated from the University of Toronto with a Doctor of Medicine degree in 1977.

    After a one-year internship, John returned to his hometown of Ridgetown, Ontario, and began practicing medicine with his father. He also joined the Kiwanis Club of Ridgetown—and he has been a member there ever since. He has served his club in a number of capacities over those 36 years. In addition, John is a distinguished lieutenant governor of his division and past governor of the Eastern Canada and the Caribbean District. He has also chaired the Iodine Deficiency Disorders Worldwide Service Project committee for his club and division.

    All that service and experience has given John some insights into the ways Kiwanis can change people’s lives—and the ways the organization itself is changing. He knows that keeping up with today’s world is a key to attracting many SLP alumni who haven’t yet joined a Kiwanis club.

    “We are becoming mission-driven as opposed to meeting-driven,” he says. “Membership options need to be flexible, as do club practices. We are evolving—and a new Kiwanis will be there for you when you are ready.  We need you, your ideas and your service muscle.”

    As president, John has a busy year ahead: He’ll be leading the organization during our celebration of Kiwanis’ 100th anniversary and the Kiwanis family’s completion of The Eliminate Project. He’ll also be an advocate for The Formula while tackling other everyday duties of being president.

    Ultimately, John’s work remains inspired by what Key Club and Circle K instilled in him as a student. “It was about fun and fellowship, but it was also about community engagement and service,” he says. “This is where I began to experience how life fulfilling service to others can be. And that belief has remained unshaken for 45 years.”

    Want to learn more about 2014–2015 Kiwanis International President John Button? Check out the October issue of Kiwanis magazine.

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  • Gear up for 100 years

    Wear your pride in Kiwanis’ 100th anniversary on your sleeve—or on your chest or your head—with centennial selections from the Kiwanis Store.
     
    Look for the exclusive section of centennial-only items and spread the word of Kiwanis’ success on your fridge, on your wall—even at your weekly card game with the elegant 100-year playing cards and dice set. It’s all available while supplies last at the Kiwanis Store. Start your celebration today.

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  • Celebrate 100 years

    Make history of your own when you celebrate Kiwanis’ 100th anniversary with a gift to The Eliminate Project. Starting in 2015, when you give US$1,500, you will save or protect more than 833 lives and be honored with a Centennial Award—complete with a custom-framed medallion and other exclusive recognition items.

    The Centennial Award is available for gifts made during the centennial year. Starting October 1, 2014, the Kiwanis International Foundation will start accepting early gifts and pledges, and recognition will be available beginning in January 2015.

    Your opportunity to leave a lasting legacy is here. Help eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus and celebrate our centennial. Find out more at www.TheEliminateProject.org/recognition.

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  • 7 ways to get “Linked in” to a new job

     

    7 ways to get “Linked in” to a new job


    More and more people are using LinkedIn.com as a way to find career opportunities or to grow their professional networks. If you use the website to promote etc, here are seven ways et.Use the versatile website to promote your personal brand and to stay connected with people in your industry.

    Here are seven ways to get the most out of the site:

    1. Consider your profile a work in progress. Your life and career will change. Your profile should change with them. Keep it updated. Upload your resume. Use keywords throughout the profile.

    2. Add a professional photo. Use one that’s properly cropped and focused, with  correct proportions and good lighting.

    3. Gain connections. Add classmates and colleagues, and stay ahead of the curve by following leaders and experts in your industry.

    4. Get praised, and show it off.  Ask as many people as possible to endorse your skills. Endorsements are an easy way for people, including potential employers, to see proof of  your talents and achievements.

    5. Share praise and info with others. Send your connections articles and content. Comment on people’s  posts. And give endorsements to others--be someone who gives credit where credit is due!

    6. Avoid personal comments. Impress others with your professionalism.

    7. Customize your URL. Make it stand out as unmistakably yours, while being able to fit it on a business card.

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  • Commemorative pins to mark 100 Kiwanis years

    When it comes to celebrating 100 years of continuous service to the children of the world, you know there’ll be commemorative pins to mark Kiwanis’ extraordinary commitment.
     
    Start your collection by planning to attend 100th anniversary celebration events. A Detroit anniversary pin will be given to all attendees of the January 2015 occasion. Throughout the year, those attending a centennial tour event will receive the tour’s official pin. At the Kiwanis 2014–15 international convention in Indianapolis, Indiana, a commemorative 100th anniversary pin and a limited edition pin set will both be for sale. Don’t miss out on those collectible items! Plan now to pin and celebrate 100 years of Kiwanis.
     

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